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Blog Reviewers

We want the Women's Health Blog to be recognized as a reputable source of information on women’s health. To achieve this goal, we're looking for multidisciplinary reviewers to ensure the information conveyed in our blogs are evidence based and meet our high standards of quality. Specifically, we are looking for reviewers that have expertise related to sex and gender-based analysis, neuroscience, public health, Indigenous studies, and intersectionality.

To learn more about the position, take a look at our reviewer guidelines and expectations

If you’d like to be a reviewer, please contact our Blog Coordinators at womenshealth.blog@ubc.ca and include a CV that outlines relevant educational, work or volunteer experience. Please note that this position is not restricted to students. We welcome all trainees and professionals with adequate expertise to be a reviewer for the Women’s Health Blog

BLOG Reviwers

Expertise: Population and Public Health

Alexandra Lukey is Alex is a first year nursing PhD student at UBC. She is also currently practicing as a Registered Nurse at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver in cardiology and cardiac surgery.  Her research passions include applying technology to improve patient self-care and improving women’s health equity with population-based data. Alex’s thesis research is focusing on improving heart failure patient self-care through gamified education. Through her CIHR Women’s Health Clinical Mentorship Grant, she is growing her observational research skills by addressing novel drug combinations to improve ovarian cancer and heart disease outcomes.

Expertise: Healthcare Design + Design Research

Bhairavi Warke is a Ph.D. Student in the School of Interactive Arts and Technology at Simon Fraser University. She holds a bachelor's degree in Instrumentation & Control Engineering from Pune University and a master's degree in Industrial Design from Arizona State University. Prior to the Ph.D. program, she worked at a start-up in Phoenix, AZ developing medical products for neonatal care and later on as a design researcher at IA Collaborative, Chicago, and then at Designit, Bangalore focusing on healthcare products & services and consumer experience. Her current research at the Pain Studies Lab focuses on 'Design of Interactive Self-care technologies for Women experiencing Menopause' to help with the management of symptoms, possible early detection or prevention of chronic conditions, and promote overall well-being.

Expertise: Neuroscience + Sex and Gender research

Kiranjot Jhajj is a Master's Student in the Psychology program at the University of Northern British Columbia. Her research interests include developing a socio-physiological understanding of the menstrual cycle. Her Master's thesis focuses on how ovarian hormone fluctuations across the menstrual cycle influence learning and how people in Northern British Columbia conceptualize menstruation.

Expertise: Cardiovascular Research, Women's Health, Sex & Gender Research

Jennifer Williams is a PhD candidate in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University, supervised by Dr. Maureen MacDonald, with a prior MSc degree from Queen’s University.  Her present PhD research focuses on the short- and long-term impact of hormonal contraceptives on cardiovascular health in women. Her recent work has since pivoted to include exploring the influence of contraceptive hormones in cardiovascular cells. She endeavours to connect human research models with cellular mechanisms, to provide an integrative perspective to women’s basic cardiovascular health research. Jennifer is also a graduate trainee with CIHR's Institute of Gender and Health and is involved in teaching undergraduate students about sex and gender in health research at McMaster University. 

Expertise: Autonomic Function, Kinesiology and Exercise Science

Tania Pereira is a PhD candidate in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Science at York University, supervised by Dr. Heather Edgell in the Women's Cardiovascular Health lab. Tania previously completed her MSc at the University of Guelph, focusing on the physiological analysis of alternative forms of physical activity. Her current PhD research focuses on the acute effects of oral contraceptives and the menstrual cycle on the cardiorespiratory and cerebrovascular response to autonomic reflex activation. She is seeking to further understand the control of physiological responses to exercise in women. She hopes to continue her research by conducting longitudinal studies and including a more extensive range of hormonal contraceptives to elucidate potential impacts on women's health. Tania is presently an Ontario Graduate Scholar and a student member of the Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology (CSEP).